A project of the Afterschool Alliance.

21st Century Community Learning Centers Administered by Coordinated Child Care of Pinellas, Inc.: Summative Evaluation Report of the School-Based Program, Year 2

Year Published: 2011

A report on the performance data for the 21st Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) program operated by Coordinated Child Care of Pinellas, Inc. under two grants from the Florida Department of Education. Program participants at all three middle schools sites were more likely to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the math, English language arts, and science Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) than students in the middle schools overall. Additionally, the report looked at the program’s impact on health and physical fitness, finding that an overwhelming majority of students participating in the program maintained a healthy Body Mass Index (BMI) or showed improvement in their BMI scores throughout the academic year, as well as were able to successfully identify the healthier foods.

Program Name: Pinellas County’s 21st Century Community Learning Centers

Program Description: Pinellas County’s 21st CCLC program, operated by Coordinated Child Care of Pinellas, Inc., was established in 2009 and serves high-needs communities, providing afterschool and summer programming that includes, but is not limited to, academic enrichment, homework help, opportunities for physical activity, team building activities, and family engagement activities. These services were provided to approximately 370 middle school students across three sites during the 2009-2010 school year.

Scope of the Evaluation: Local

Program Type: Summer, Afterschool

Location: Pinellas County, FL

Community Type: Urban, Suburban

Grade level: Middle School

Program Demographics: The program was split evenly with 50 percent of students being female and 50 percent male. The ethnic/race demographics of the program was 54 percent of participants were Caucasian, 27 percent were African-American, 22 percent were Hispanic/Latino, 1 percent were Asian/Pacific Islander, and less than one percent were Native American. Sixty percent of all participants and 57 percent of regular participants (at least 30 days) qualified for Free or Reduced-Price Lunch. Fifty-one percent all participants and 49 percent of regular participants come from single parent households; 23 percent of all participants and 25 percent of regular participants had disabilities or special needs, and 3 percent of all participants were English Language Learners.

Program Website: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/msy/start/Pages/CCCPinellas.aspx

Evaluator: Silver, S.E. & Albert, R.J. Juvenile Welfare Board Children’s Services Council of Pinellas County.

Evaluation Methods: Data were collected on student demographics, program attendance rates, grades, disciplinary referrals, school-day absences, and Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test results.

Evaluation Type: Non-experimental

Summary of Outcomes: The report found that students regularly participating in the Pinellas County 21st Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) program performed better than students overall on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). Ninety-five percent of regular attendees met or exceeded standards on the English language arts (ELA) FCAT compared with 62 percent of all students across the three sites; 85 percent of regular attendees met or exceeded standards on the science FCAT compared with only 40 percent of all students, and 84 percent of regular attendees met or exceeded standards on the math FCAT compared with 59 percent of all students.

The report also looked at the program’s impact on health and physical fitness. Among students participating in the program, 81 percent maintained a healthy Body Mass Index (BMI) or showed improvement in their BMI scores throughout the academic year. Students participating in the program were also tested on their knowledge of nutrition; 82 percent of students in the program were able to successfully identify the healthier foods.

Examining the program’s impact on student behavior, the evaluation found that, among the students in the program that had at least one disciplinary referral in the first semester, 36 percent of students received fewer disciplinary referrals the second semester of the program compared to their first semester in the program.